From architecture

Photographer Liz Arenberg roams the hills of rural Vermont for the series Eden. Her cooly radiant images depict scenes of winter abandonment that evoke a sense of both painful vacancy and soothing quietude. Produced during her time as an artist-in-residence at the Vermont Studio Center in response to the loss of a pregnancy, Eden is a…

Arrows of the Dawn (2013-present) references a series of short essays and manifestos published by the Byrdcliffe Colony, which was a failed Utopian community for artists, started at the beginning of the 20th century in Woodstock, New York. While the founders had high hopes of this being a self-sustaining artist colony in tune with the…

As part of Serpentine Magazine‘s music issue, we bring you the music of our lives: Everyday Radio, an online exhibition of sound. Using the mobile application Periscope, a social media platform built around livestreaming video, the artists will remove the visual and broadcast purely audio. The app’s slogan is “Explore The World Through Someone Else’s Eyes” but…

1. As we were walking home one afternoon after a dispiriting apartment viewing in Neukölln, my wife paused next to an undistinguished block of pigeon-gray flats. “There’s a giant airplane hanging in that window,” she said, and pointed to the disused brewery across the street. She was right. It was a big yellow plane, hung…

READ: 1. Almost Famous Women by Megan Mayhew Bergman (Scribner, January 2015) Almost impossibly over-hyped, this second collection from Bergman about woman from the fringes of history already feels like a classic. 2. The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro (Faber and Faber, March 2015) Unarguably one of the most important authors of contemporary note, famed…